Should trees grow over your house?

Generally, a tree should be planted at least fifteen feet away from the foundation of a house. For larger, high-floor species (more than sixty feet), that distance should be increased to at least twenty feet from the foundations and landscape features.

Should trees grow over your house?

Generally, a tree should be planted at least fifteen feet away from the foundation of a house. For larger, high-floor species (more than sixty feet), that distance should be increased to at least twenty feet from the foundations and landscape features. Trees that grow too close to your home can damage the foundation or roof and encourage the invasion of insects, rodents and birds. However, cutting down large trees yourself can be dangerous, so always seek professional help if you decide to take this action.

Generally, trees should be about 15 feet away from a house. Some large species need a little more space, while smaller ones may be a little closer. It is important to know where the sewer or septic line is located on your property, as planting trees too close to it will increase the risk of blockages. Tree roots can eventually grow through pipes as they move into groundwater, and this can cause costly damage to your plumbing system.

In addition, trees that are too close to houses can affect drainage, causing more water to accumulate near the house, increasing the risk of mold and rot. How do I know if a tree is dead? How should I report it? Who should I call if my tree needs pruning? Even if you have already cut down a lot of trees on your property and think you can handle these steps, you'd better call a professional for your tree removal needs. When you use the right pruning techniques, you can prevent tree branches from growing back quickly and at the same time protect the health of your tree. If you don't have adequate space for a tree to grow to this size, consider trees that are smaller or look for a different landscaping option that may work better for the area.

If your tree is very close to your home and a specialist believes it is not a safety hazard, he or she may recommend that you take other safety precautions, such as pruning trees. When you call a tree professional, you may benefit from having a second opinion as to whether the tree is in poor health or if it is growing too close to home. In most cases, you have the right to prune tree branches that extend to your property, even if the tree is planted in a neighbor's yard. If you want to plant a new tree in your garden, remember to consider the total width and height that the tree will reach when fully grown.

The type of trees you have will determine when and how you prune them to avoid damaging the health of your trees. Trees and shrubs can act as a wind tunnel to direct the breeze into the house, but be sure to branch the branches high enough to allow the breeze to pass under the tree. While at other times, it is better and safer to avoid the possibility of an accident and remove a tree that is growing too close to your home or that is dying. Trees can cause soil moisture to fluctuate because of the water needed to keep a tree alive.

Of course, a tree looks better just 10 or 20 feet from your house than at 30 or 40 feet and you still get some shade in the house, which could result in energy savings, but the closer the tree is and depending on its root systems, it could dig into its foundation and literally damage the structure of your house. Whether tree branches are rubbing against your house, if you want to remove a tree, or simply want help with general tree care, ABC Home %26 Commercial Services can help.

Lester Masteller
Lester Masteller

Total zombie specialist. Incurable food trailblazer. Avid zombie buff. Subtly charming zombie scholar. Subtly charming coffee junkie.

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